Others, Road Trip, Sightseeings

Roadtripping during the Fall | Perfect time to see America’s Most Beautiful Covered Bridges

Fall is the perfect time to do a Roadtrip through America. While enjoying scenic vistas and fall colors, it is also a wonderful time of year to travel the scenic byways and visit some of the nation’s beautiful covered bridges.


 

Covered bridges have distinguished America’s rural roads since the early 1800s and still draw tourists today. While many of these charming structures have been lost to modern upgrades, plenty of the historic bridges have been preserved. The most famous of these are the six remaining in Madison County, Iowa, which were immortalized in the novel, movie, and play The Bridges of Madison County, but spectacular examples can be found across the country.

There are so many Covered Bridges across the USA that have their own special stories to tell.

 

Sachs Covered Bridge, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

David S. Stoner constructed the Sachs Covered Bridge, which traverses Marsh Creek, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1852. The Town lattice truss overpass was used by both Union and Confederate troops during the battle of Gettysburg in 1863. Now open to pedestrians, it’s a popular destination for ghost tours.

Adress: Waterworks Rd, Gettysburg, PA 17325, US

Saschs Covered bridge

 

Flume Covered Bridge, Franconia Notch, New Hampshire

With walls of granite rising up to 90 feet high, the Flume is a natural gorge and waterfall formed nearly 200 million years ago. During the Ice Age, it was masked by glaciers that later melted into a bubbling brook. Large rock formations mark the Pemigewasset River, which is ornamented by the distinctive Flume Covered Bridge (est. 1886) and its adjacent footbridge for hikers.

Adress: Lincoln, New Hampshire 03251, US

Flume Covered Bridge

 

Campbell’s Covered Bridge, Landrum, South Carolina

South Carolina’s only remaining covered bridge is short and sweet—a cheery red pinewood structure measuring 38 feet across Beaverdam Creek. Bordered by the Greenville County Recreation District, the bridge makes a romantic backdrop for picnics, especially come autumn. It’s named for the former owner of a nearby corn gristmil.

Adress: 171 Campbell Covered Bridge Rd, Landrum, SC 29356, US

Campbell Covered Bridge

 

West Cornwall Covered Bridge, Cornwall, Connecticut

Leaf peepers flock to Housatonic Meadows State Park—Connecticut’s only stretch of the Appalachian Trail—for riverside camping and hiking amid 10,000 acres of foliage. As you drive past the park, keep an eye out for West Cornwall Covered Bridge, a red wooden landmark designed by Connecticut native Ithiel Town.

Adress: Housatonic River, Connecticut, West Cornwall, CT 06796, US

west Cornwall Covered Bridge

 

Weddle Covered Bridge, Sweet Home, Oregon

The Weddle Covered Bridge was built in 1937 using the open-sided style typical of Linn County, Oregon. It spanned Thomas Creek until 1987, when it was disassembled. After a campaign by area residents, it was reassembled in 1989 over Ames Creek in Sankey Park.

Adress: Sweet Home, Oregon 97386, US

weddle covered bridge

 

Horton Bridge, Amnicon Falls State Park, Wisconsin

A trek through Amnicon Falls State Park delivers a close-up perspective on geologic arrangements formed by earthquakes half a billion years ago. Prehistoric rocks mix with volcanic material along the scenic River Trail, winding past mini pools, cascades, and waterfalls. For the best view, take to the Horton Bridge over the Lower Falls. And keep a lookout for deer and coyote.

Adress: 4279 County Rd U, South Range, WI 54874, US

Horton Covered Bridge

 

Humpback Covered Bridge, Covington, Virginia

Humpback Covered Bridge, which lies west of Covington, Virginia, was built in 1857 and is the oldest of Virginia’s remaining covered bridges. It was closed to vehicular traffic in 1929 and is now part of a wayside park.

Adress: Midland Trail, Covington, VA 24426, US

Humpback Covered Bridge

 

Stark Covered Bridge, Groveton, New Hampshire

The Stark Covered Bridge uses a Paddleford truss design, a support structure created by builder Peter Paddleford in the 19th century. Completed in 1862 and spanning the Upper Ammonoosuc River in New Hampshire’s Stark Village, it washed downstream in the 1890s but was set back in place. The bridge was reconstructed in 1954 to handle modern traffic and is currently undergoing a renovation.

Adress: Stark, North Road of Stark Village, NH-110, Groveton, NH 03582, US

Stark Covered Bridge

 

Artist’s Bridge, Newry, Maine

Maine’s covered bridges first appeared in the mid-1800s to pave the way for horse-drawn caravans. Before fire, flood, and ice took their toll, the state counted 120 of these historic structures: only nine still stand. While Artist’s Bridge—constructed in 1872 above the Sunday River near the town of North Bethel—is no longer open to traffic, it remains one of Maine’s most photographed and painted sites.

Adress: Sunday River, Newry, ME 04261, US

Artist covered bridge

 

A. M. Foster Covered Bridge, Cabot, Vermont

Vermont’s cheese trail offers roughly 280 miles of sharp cheddar, creamy Gorgonzola, and herby chèvre. Hit the road, and you’ll likely end up near the Cabot Creamery and A. M. Foster Covered Bridge, which spans a ravine in the middle of farmland. It’s a comparative newcomer to these parts, designed in 1988 by resident Richard Spaulding to replicate the 19th-century Orton Bridge.

Adress: 1645 Cabot Plains Rd, Cabot, VT 05647, US

Foster Covered Bridge

 

Tips

  • For roadtripping Ohio scenic covered bridges
    Travelers can take the National Forest Covered Bridge Scenic Byway which follows State Route 26 from Marietta to Woodsfield, Ohio. For most of its length, it parallels the Little Muskingum River and traverses some of Ohio’s most beautiful countryside. There are five campgrounds along the byway. The Scenic Byway is a self-guided tour to interpret 35 miles of scenery and history along the Little Muskingum River. To guide you along the tour, there are tour markers that lead you to each of the ten stops. The tour is approximately four hours.
  • Covered Bridges of Madison County Tour Excursions
    Group tours of the Covered Bridges are their specialty! They tailor tours to match your group’s size and schedule. Each tour includes information about the construction and history of the bridges, the movie production, and a variety of local historical information. Choose a tour with one of their knowledgeable step-on guides.
  • Madison County Covered Bridge Festival
    Mark Your Calendars!
    Dates: October 13-14, 2018 / 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
    Admission: $2.00 (Children 11 and under FREE)
    49 th Annual Madison County Covered Bridge 2018 Festival Info

 


 

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3 thoughts on “Roadtripping during the Fall | Perfect time to see America’s Most Beautiful Covered Bridges”

    1. Yes, you should definitely do that. They are so beautiful, and if you are in the area, why not. I wish you a lot of fun. Will you let me know whitch one you liked the most when the trip is over? Have a save trip. Thank you for reading my blog

      Like

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